About

Why “Causeways”?

cause·way /ˈkôzˌwā/ noun  1. a raised road or path, as across low or wet ground.

A raised path, lifting us above the muck and the mire; trying to find the high road… isn’t that really what we’re all doing? We are all flung into this amazing universe and onto this gigantic rock, and we are left to make sense of it all. But do we ever? Can we ever? Through which lenses and through what philosophies do we reach the summit of understanding? Perhaps it is the not knowing that draws us ever closer to the Divine. Maybe it is the wistful chasing of righteousness—the wanting of authenticity, of truth, of Love—that hurls us ever forward into a perpetual voyage: a voyage in which our destination becomes not our stopping place, but only another step in our journey.

I was born in northeastern Kentucky, into the most wonderful family in the world. My parents encouraged me in my faith and inspired me to seek God in all things. Raised in a conservative Christian church, I eventually ended up at a Christian liberal arts university in the south, where I obtained my degree in Psychology and Bible. Thus, I’ve always been extremely interested in how one’s mind and psyche interact with their spirituality and religious philosophies. As of late, I’ve added Christian theology to my nerd-list of acute interests. I am in love with my Creator. I used to think understanding Him was easy. I used to think it was black and white. Throughout the last several years I’ve been on a journey… one that brings me to an unexpected place just about every day. My personal theology is not nearly as conservative as it once was. There have been hard questions I’ve had to face to bring about those changes… many of which have to do with Biblical translations, historical-criticism, social issues, and human suffering. Thoughts about these issues consume much of my time; it has become a bit of an obsession—although I believe it is a worthwhile one.

The best way for me to unpack my thoughts and feelings is by writing them down… and so, I decided it was time to give my blog an overhaul. You may notice—if you are so inclined to read my ramblings—that I have left my old posts up. There, you will find a hodgepodge of subjects, ranging from grief to conspiracy theories to slice of life. But for now, this blog will veer more toward a focus on theology, philosophy, and spirituality.

Emerson said, “Knowledge is knowing that we cannot know.” This has become a mantra of sorts, for me. Within this statement, there is the suggestion that the spiritual life is ever-changing and ever-flowing. What we think we know today may prove to be false tomorrow. What we could not accept yesterday may have a newfound meaning today. I think it’s important to share those things—to discuss, to listen, to learn—even if we do not agree with one another. And when we discover that we cannot know, we will also discover the truth of sola fide (by faith alone)… because it is not only our faith that saves us; it is our faith that makes us sane.

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9 responses to “About

  1. What a wonderful litany of your life! You have really touched my soul; your words reveal growth.

    It is my prayer also, that many will see the very one who matters. Blessings…

  2. H Mandy,
    What a joy to be introduced to you! You are a beautiful person because you are real and authentic. I have only read a little of your writings but already I connect with you and your journey. My year of 2010-11 was also a yer of refining and even though the refining is difficult to say the least it has resulted n a freedom I have never experienced before.
    I look forward to your blogs in this coming year as you share your heart with us.

  3. Thank you so much! I really appreciate that, and it means the world to know that someone relates to my ramblings. God bless you in this coming year!

  4. Love you sweet girl, and think of you often!

    I, too, am a blogger, and writing has become such an important part of my life! I love it when we can share a part of ourselves, and hopefully help others in some way.

    I hope you know that I’m always here for you if you ever need me! Miss being with you on a regular basis, and pray for you daily!

    • Darlene! I find myself thinking of you and all the girls at Madison quite often! I have great memories of you, Leanne, and Dawn. It’s really been forever since I’ve seen you!

      I didn’t know you had a blog! I’m going to look it up right now. 🙂 I love writing… it helps me in so many ways. It’s so good to hear from you.

  5. Pingback: Five Things That Shook the Foundations of My Fundamentalist Faith | Causeways·

  6. Your very refreshing and interesting column, “The History of Biblical Literalism: What You May Not Know” (Causeways: 24 March 2013) has been referenced in a new Wikipedia article “Biblical literalist chronology”. I am the principal author and would be most grateful for details of the texts of the scholarly sources of historical information you read on the subject and of the particular texts of the publications of writers quoted there:
    *Which scholars did you find who date modern Christian fundamentalism specifically to the 1878 Niagara Bible Conference as the significant beginning date?
    *Which scholars did you find who point to Martin Luther’s sola scriptura as marking the birth of fundamentalism?
    *Where in his public statements did Urban T. Holmes (I assume you referred to Urban T. Holmes III, not to his father Urban T. Holmes, Jr.) state that ‘literalism is a modern heresy’?
    *Where in Ruth Tiffany Barnhouse’s writings is the statement ‘the bastard child of science and religion’?
    If you can recall where you found this information, please submit the data pertaining to those publications at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical_literalist_chronology#cite_note-Wilson2013-5
    A heartfelt Thank you for your witness to the reality of Our Lord Jesus Christ!
    “Encyclopedic researcher” (Wikipedia).

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